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Applied Dynamics Seminar Series

 

Applied Dynamics Seminar Series

 

Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.

 

IREAP Large Conference Room (ERF 1207)

The organizers of the Applied Dynamics seminar gratefully acknowledge support from

the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics and the Institute for Physical Science and Technology.

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February 2, 2020

Cell Dynamics and Excitable Systems

Wolfgang Losert

University of Maryland | Department of Physics and IREAP

Abstract: The guided migration of cells is a complex dynamical process involving carefully regulated polymerization and depolymerization of the elements of the cellular scaffolding, in particular actin. Recent work has shown that polymerizing and depolymerizing actin can be described as an excitable system which exhibits natural waves or oscillations on scales of hundreds of nm, and that wave-like dynamics can be seen in a wide range of natural contexts. I will show that physical signals nucleate and guide these the wave-like dynamics, and that such guided actin waves control cell migration for a broad range of cell types. This opens up novel approaches to control cell behavior.

February 13, 2020

Title TBA

Shelby Wilson

University of Maryland | Department of Biology

Abstract: TBA

Pratyush Tiwary, 2020

From atoms to dynamics (with help from statistical physics and AI)

Pratyush Tiwary

University of Maryland | Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Abstract: TBA

February 27, 2020

Utilizing Noise to Alter Dynamic Response of Coupled Oscillator Arrays

Gizem Acar

University of Maryland | Department of Mechanical Engineering

Abstract: Noise has usually been considered as an unwanted disturbance and considerable research has been done on noise reduction in dynamical systems over the past decades. Alternatively, one can view noise as a means to alter the dynamic response of a nonlinear system. The nonlinear systems of interest are coupled oscillator arrays, which can be used to describe rotary systems and energy harnessing systems. In these systems, response localizations can occur. With an appropriate choice of initial conditions and harmonic input, a coupled oscillator system can be excited to realize a periodic response, wherein one or more oscillators oscillate with much higher amplitudes compared to the rest of the oscillators. This type of spatial localization of energy can be suppressed by introducing Gaussian noise into the system. In this talk, we will focus on guiding the system response between different periodic orbits realized for harmonic forcing, through the addition of Gaussian noise in the input. We also explore how long it takes for the noise to suppress energy localization.

March 5, 2020

Title TBA

Speaker TBA

Institution TBA | Unit TBA

Abstract: TBA

March 12, 2020

Testing of a Hybrid Modeling Approach for the Prediction of the Atmospheric State by Blending Numerical Modeling and Machine Learning

Istvan Szunyogh

Texas A&M | Department of Atmospheric Sciences

Abstract: TBA

March 19, 2020

Spring Break - No seminar

March 26, 2020

Title TBA

Speaker TBA

Institution TBA | Unit TBA

Abstract: TBA

April 4, 2020

Title TBA

Speaker TBA

Institution TBA | Unit TBA

Abstract: TBA

April 9, 2020

Title TBA

Speaker TBA

Institution TBA | Unit TBA

Abstract: TBA

April 16, 2020

Title TBA

Louis Pecora

Naval Research Laboratory

Abstract: TBA

April 23, 2020

Title TBA

Joseph Hart

Naval Research Laboratory

Abstract: TBA

April 30, 2020

Title TBA

Speaker TBA

Institution TBA | Unit TBA

Abstract: TBA

May 5, 2020

Title TBA

Speaker TBA

Institution TBA | Unit TBA

Abstract: TBA

May 14, 2020

Solving hard computational problems with coupled lasers

Nir Davidson

Weizmann Institute of Science

Abstract: Hard computational problems may be solved by realizing physics systems that can simulate them. Here we present a new system of coupled lasers in a modified degenerate cavity that is used to solve difficult computational tasks. The degenerate cavity possesses a huge number of degrees of freedom (300,000 modes in our system), that can be coupled and controlled with direct access to both the x-space and k-space components of the lasing mode. Placing constraints on these components can be mapped to different computational minimization problems. Due to mode competition, the lasers select the mode with minimal loss to find the solution. We demonstrate this ability for simulating XY spin systems and finding their ground state, for phase retrieval, for imaging through scattering medium and more.

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