Bias Incidents

Non-exhaustive definition

An act expressing bias against a particular group, or towards an individual because of their membership (or perceived membership) in that group

Who to report through?

Office of Diversity and Inclusion (diversity.umd.edu/)

How to report?

Email biassupport@umd.edu or submit a report online

More info

diversity.umd.edu/bias/response/

 

Discrimination

Non-exhaustive definition

Discrimination and harassment based on race, color, sex, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, marital status, age, national origin, political affiliation, physical or mental disability, religion, protected veteran status or any other legally protected characteristic

Who to report through?

Office of Civil Rights & Sexual Misconduct (ocrsm.umd.edu and 301-405-1142)

How to report?

Submit a report online

More info

ocrsm.umd.edu/discrimination/

 

Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct

Non-exhaustive definition

https://policies.umd.edu/assets/section-vi/VI-160A.pdf

Who to report through?

Office of Civil Rights & Sexual Misconduct (ocrsm.umd.edu and 301-405-1142)

How to report?

Submit a report online

More info

 

CARE to Stop Violence (sexual assault/violence support)

(Campus Advocates Respond and Educate (CARE) to Stop Violence provides free, confidential advocacy and therapy services to primary and secondary survivors of sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, and sexual harassment, while simultaneously empowering the campus community to prevent violence through educational presentations, events, and outreach activities.

Find out more and how to contact them  at https://health.umd.edu/CARE

 

 

  • Name Drop (https://namedrop.io/)
    • A name pronunciation service that allows users to record their name and its meaning and gives users a personal link of the recording to be used on various platforms.

 

image.pngAre you an UndocuTerp? DACA, TPS, or Undocumented Students find your resources and engage with the USP.

  • Decolonization is not a Metaphor: Pedagogy and Praxis
    • In recent decades calls to decolonize curriculums, classrooms and minds grow more and more urgent. In this panel discussion, we take this conversation further—what does the work of decolonization actually require of us as instructors, scholars and leaders? What would happen if we saw higher education within the context of a long legacy of settler colonialism? And why has this language been so easy to co-opt? Panel with: Dr. Rossina Zamora Liu, Dr. Bayley Marquez, Dr. Ayush Gupta. Moderator: Dr. Janelle Wong
  • How I am Fighting Bias in Algorithms (Clip: 00:00 - 03:07)
    • MIT research scientist, Jot Buolamwini, realized her face wasn't recognized in facial recognition technology and this motivated her to fight bias in machine learning.
  • How Racism Makes Us Sick (Clip: 6:14 - 10:00)
    • Dr. David Williams of Harvard School of Public Health has developed a scale that measures the impact of racism on health and well- being and recognizes some examples of hope for dismantling discrimination and improving health.
  • Why Genetic Research Must Be More Diverse (Clip: 4:30 - 6:40)
    • Genomic scientist, Dr. Keolu Fox, discusses the limitations of human genomic science studies, which have mostly focused on people of European descent. He uses communities of native Hawaiian people to give historical context and an example of how a more inclusive approach to the study of genomes and disease might provide more racial/ ethnic relevance and context for improving health.
  • Two Different Realities: Why America Needs Environmental Justice (Clip: 00:27 to 4:04)
    • Proud residents of Lousiana discuss the sustained decline of their communities located in "cancer alley" and how, through environmental racism, big businesses and lax regulation take advantage of communities of color and of low income. Groups are fostering community- based action to educate people about environmental justice and empowering community residents fighting for clean air.
  • The Era of Blind Faith in Big Data Must End (Clip: 5:43 - 10:20)
    • Mathematician and data scientist, Dr. Cathy O'Neil (author of UMD Freshman Book "Weapons of Math Destruction"), discusses the impact of algorithms in everyday life and decision- making and how issues of algorithmic bias and algorithmic secrecy have affected such things as performance evaluations of teachers, hiring practices, and bias in policing and sentencing.
  • When Neurodiversity Works (Clip: 2:20 - 7:34)
    • Individuals with autism spectrum disorder speak about the challenges of finding meaningful work in the technology industry and in achieving independence. An example of an inclusive employment program at IBM has facilitated entry into the workforce.

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